nextgenforensic

Long-term reconviction rates for individuals convicted of indecent image offences appear to be low

Ian A. Elliott

Although they’re a relatively small proportion of individuals convicted of sexual offences there is increasing concern about the behaviours and management of individuals with offenses relating to indecent images of children (IIOC) online. The consensus in the literature appears to be that, contrary to popular notions, sex offenders don’t reoffend at high rates and that the rate for IIOC offenders is lower than those who commit contact sexual offences. This post summarises the findings of our new study into (relatively) long-term reconviction rates for IIOC users.

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Understanding the cognitions of child sexual exploitation material offenders

Danielle Kettleborough

The endorsement of offence-supportive cognitions has been discussed as a contributing factor in initialising and maintaining sexually abusive behaviour against children.  Ward and Keenan (1999) propose that, for child sex offenders, their offence-supportive cognitions emerge from five implicit theories, about the nature of their victims, the world, and themselves. These five theories are labelled Children as Sexual Objects, Entitlement, Dangerous World, Uncontrollability of Offending Behaviour, and Nature of Harm.  The aim of some research colleagues and myself recently conducted was to explore, and further our understanding of, the cognitions of individuals with an offence related to child sexual exploitation material (CSEM).

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Community reboot: Getting former prisoners safely back online

Ian A. Elliott

For a number of years now I have been involved in a series of projects that have sought to answer a modern reentry conundrum: given the ubiquity and the professed positive effects of internet access, how can we safely incorporate ‘online reentry’ into parole and probation community practice, both generally and for those where internet access was a part of their crimes? How can we encourage and support internet use while at the same time impede potential criminal opportunities that such access may afford?

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