nextgenforensic

Transnational child sex offenders: A not so new but distinct type of child sex offender?

Sarah Wefers (@s_wefers on Twitter)

For years, and decades even, so-called “child sex tourism” has been an issue that has attracted public interest. Several offenders, who travelled abroad and sexually abused children there, have gained notoriety.  One example is Richard Huckle, who is believed to have abused up to 200 children in extremely poor parts of Southeast Asia. He gained access to children through churches and orphanages, presenting as a philanthropist and grooming the local communities. He abused this trust to assault children and produced indecent images, which he shared on the Dark Web with other offenders. He even compiled a “manual” giving advice on how best to groom and abuse children from developing countries.

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Female child sexual abusers – how are they getting away with it in organisational contexts?

Andrea Darling

Hardly a week goes by nowadays when there isn’t a newspaper article covering the latest female teacher to ‘engage in a sexual relationship’ with a pupil. Examples can be found in the UK, US, Canada and Australia.

By female child sexual abusers in organisational contexts, I’m referring to those women in positions of trust with children and young people and abuse within the organisations and institutions in which they work, either in paid positions or voluntarily. This includes teachers, social workers, nurses, sports coaches, nursery workers, and care staff for example.
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“The children in the images were not harmed”: Permission-giving thoughts relating to child sexual exploitation material offending

Danielle Kettleborough

Following on from the recent blog post detailing the development of the Children, Internet, and Sex Cognitions (CISC) scale, this post will further explore the findings from this research, focusing on the permission-giving thoughts endorsed by individuals with an offence related to child sexual exploitation material (CSEM).

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What’s wrong with “child pornography”? The impact of terminology

Danielle Kettleborough

As researchers, we make choices daily about what terminology to use in our reports.  We take our writing seriously and try to write as intelligibly as possible, but we often don’t think twice about the specific terms we use. We may not consciously choose a particular term, it’s just something we have become familiar with and use it so often that we don’t always consider its impact.

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Incest: What we know (and don’t know)

Lesleigh Pullman

Although this topic definitely does not make for good dinner conversation, attempting to understand the causes of sexual offending against children is an ongoing endeavour. But we’ve done pretty well so far. Much is known about the causes of child sexual abuse generally. Two key motivational factors that have been highlighted are atypical sexual interests and antisociality. However, much less is known about the causes of incest. Incestuous sexual offending is puzzling not only from a social and moral perspective (i.e., the incest taboo), but also from a biological perspective. Inbreeding depression (what happens when we have offspring with close relatives) increases the likelihood of birth defects and infant mortality. Presumably, we have evolved strong mechanisms for avoiding incest because sex with our relatives is bad for the survival of our genes!

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Understanding the cognitions of child sexual exploitation material offenders

Danielle Kettleborough

The endorsement of offence-supportive cognitions has been discussed as a contributing factor in initialising and maintaining sexually abusive behaviour against children.  Ward and Keenan (1999) propose that, for child sex offenders, their offence-supportive cognitions emerge from five implicit theories, about the nature of their victims, the world, and themselves. These five theories are labelled Children as Sexual Objects, Entitlement, Dangerous World, Uncontrollability of Offending Behaviour, and Nature of Harm.  The aim of some research colleagues and myself recently conducted was to explore, and further our understanding of, the cognitions of individuals with an offence related to child sexual exploitation material (CSEM).

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Nextgenforensic at ATSA 2014: Caoilte Ó Ciardha

Caoilte Ó Ciardha

I always come back from the ATSA conference feeling refreshed and motivated. Connecting with peers and friends sparks new ideas and a fresh enthusiasm for research. After returning from #ATSA2014, I was also fortunate enough to present for an inspiring group of PhD students at the Dutch-Flemish Experimental Psychopathology Postgraduate School, feeling additionally motivated as a result. I’ve included below a summary of my contributions at ATSA.

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