nextgenforensic

The truth about stories: How men desist from sexual offending

Ian McPhail

“The truth about stories is that’s all we are.” This is how Thomas King, America-Canadian First Nations author, begins his 2003 Massey Lectures.  That phrase has resonated with me since I read it over ten years ago; in fact, it’s never strayed too far from my mind.  There is a power in stories: we are drawn to tell stories and construct fictions about ourselves and our world.  In this post, my interest is in exploring some of the stories told by men who desist from sexual offending.

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The link between pedophilia and height

Ian McPhail

If I were to ask the question, “what are some markers of early development experiences that might be linked to the development of pedophilic interests?”  I doubt most people would suggest “physical height”.  But to the contrary, pedophilic sex offenders are, on average, 1.7cm shorter than other groups of people (for example, other sex offender groups, non-offenders).  A more recent study by Fazio and colleagues found pedophilic offenders to be 3.09cm shorter than non-pedophilic offenders.

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Current research: Understanding the puzzle of incest

Lesleigh Pullman

The causes of sexual abuse by fathers toward their children are not well understood. Factors related to family dynamics, such as parenting style, could be a useful explanation. More research is needed to understand how family dynamics may play a role in father-child incest.

The purpose of our research is to test explanations of why some men abuse their children. We are trying to find out if fathers who commit sex offences against their own children are different from fathers who do not commit such offences. Finding out more about these possible explanations for incest can help us to better understand the motivation behind these offences and, ultimately, how to reduce them through assessment and treatment.

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Female child sexual abusers – how are they getting away with it in organisational contexts?

Andrea Darling

Hardly a week goes by nowadays when there isn’t a newspaper article covering the latest female teacher to ‘engage in a sexual relationship’ with a pupil. Examples can be found in the UK, US, Canada and Australia.

By female child sexual abusers in organisational contexts, I’m referring to those women in positions of trust with children and young people and abuse within the organisations and institutions in which they work, either in paid positions or voluntarily. This includes teachers, social workers, nurses, sports coaches, nursery workers, and care staff for example.
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Untangling sexual homicide

Ross Bartels

In this post, I argue that the classification system commonly used to determine if a murder is sexual in nature has led to a muddled view of what sexual homicide (and a sexual homicide offender) is. In the past few years, there have been numerous studies published on the topic of sexual homicide. Compared to other forms of sexual offending, sexual homicide is rare. Nevertheless, it does happen. Therefore, some clinicians will have to assess and treat sexual homicide offenders. Given this, and the severity of the crime, sexual homicide is an important topic of study. A big problem that sexual homicide researchers face, however, is the apparent difficulty in defining sexual homicide.

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Can we analyze word associations in online solicitation transcripts using online software Overview? Part 2

Hollie Richardson

Last year Ian Elliott began investigating the use of free, open-source online text analysis tool Overview (read Ian’s post here) to examine online grooming transcripts. The tool – originally designed for investigative journalists and more recently used by researchers – searches and analyses huge sets of documents simultaneously and provides a visualization of the broad trends and patterns across these documents in the form of ‘topic trees’. This post describes the findings of an updated analysis with a larger sample.

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