nextgenforensic

Long-term reconviction rates for individuals convicted of indecent image offences appear to be low

Ian A. Elliott

Although they’re a relatively small proportion of individuals convicted of sexual offences there is increasing concern about the behaviours and management of individuals with offenses relating to indecent images of children (IIOC) online. The consensus in the literature appears to be that, contrary to popular notions, sex offenders don’t reoffend at high rates and that the rate for IIOC offenders is lower than those who commit contact sexual offences. This post summarises the findings of our new study into (relatively) long-term reconviction rates for IIOC users.

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Transnational child sex offenders: A not so new but distinct type of child sex offender?

Sarah Wefers (@s_wefers on Twitter)

For years, and decades even, so-called “child sex tourism” has been an issue that has attracted public interest. Several offenders, who travelled abroad and sexually abused children there, have gained notoriety.  One example is Richard Huckle, who is believed to have abused up to 200 children in extremely poor parts of Southeast Asia. He gained access to children through churches and orphanages, presenting as a philanthropist and grooming the local communities. He abused this trust to assault children and produced indecent images, which he shared on the Dark Web with other offenders. He even compiled a “manual” giving advice on how best to groom and abuse children from developing countries.

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Examining pedophilic interest as a risk factor for sexual re-offending

By Ian McPhail (@IanVMcPhail on twitter)

One of the central preoccupations of forensic psychology is identifying what psychological and social characteristics may contribute to re-offending.  This concept is straightforward and important.  When someone commits an offence, is caught and convicted, and becomes involved in the criminal justice system, we want to understand what separates those who return to criminal behaviour and those who do not.  When we understand this, people working with individuals who have committed sexual offences can help them limit the influence of these problems in their lives and increase the chance that they will desist from crime.

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Examining the latent structure of pedophilic interest

By Ian McPhail (@IanVMcPhail on twitter)

In the last five years, there has been a series of attempts by forensic and sex scientists to examine and elucidate the latent structure of sexual interests in prepubescent children, or, pedophilic interest. In this blog post, I will discuss what latent structure is and what the recent science has been finding. In two upcoming blog posts, I will examine the ramifications of this recent latent structure research.

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Tips for peer reviewing scientific articles

Caoilte Ó Ciardha & Kelly M. Babchishin

Over the last year or so, we’ve started new roles as associate editors at the Journal of Sexual Aggression (CÓC) and Sexual Abuse (KB). Transitioning from simply presenting opinions for consideration to making the decisions on people’s work has been daunting but eye-opening. For example, you would not believe the amount of people who turn down reviewing. We get it, reviewing is a hassle, and when that one-week1 reminder arrives telling you the review is due you will invariably curse your past self who naively assumed you would have somehow cleared the steaming pile of work off your desk to make room for it.

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Do you speak the common (risk) language? A guide to risk for sexual offending

Andrew E. Brankley

7,099—that is the number of different languages spoken on Earth. How many do you speak? Most people only speak one and, if you are reading this blog, it is probably English. Learning English is highly valued because it is spoken in so many different countries; it is a common language. A common language is especially valuable in coordinating professionals and the public to prevent sexual abuse.

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